Corporate Profiling

Tuesday, 14th February
9:00am - 5:00pm
Australian Eastern Standard Time

 

Tuesday, 14th February
9:00am - 5:00pm
Australian Eastern Standard Time

 

01.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has not been the only disruptor to global supply chains in 2020/21. The SolarWinds cyber-attack and the impact of escalating trade tensions have prompted many government agencies and organisations around the world to devote more attention and resources to supply chain risk and resilience. The Australian Government's focus on supply chains is being replicated by governments across the world.  

Businesses and government agencies manage risk through a process of local optimisation - meaning they do not integrate with their supply chain to manage risk. By using OSINT tools and techniques to analyse and assess risk within a supply chain becomes critical. This course teaches OSINT tools and techniques that reveal the threats and vulnerabilities corporate entities and by extension, supply chains face. They can be used to inform decision making for organisations of any size, such as large multinational corporations, small not-for-profits, and academic institutions. Although supply chains vary immensely across sectors, vulnerabilities, and the threats that exploit them, are relatively consistent. 

02.

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03.

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What is this Training about?  

The COVID-19 pandemic has not been the only disruptor to global supply chains in 2020/21. The SolarWinds cyber-attack and the impact of escalating trade tensions have prompted many government agencies and organisations around the world to devote more attention and resources to supply chain risk and resilience. The Australian Government's focus on supply chains is being replicated by governments across the world.  

Businesses and government agencies manage risk through a process of local optimisation - meaning they do not integrate with their supply chain to manage risk. By using OSINT tools and techniques to analyse and assess risk within a supply chain becomes critical. This course teaches OSINT tools and techniques that reveal the threats and vulnerabilities corporate entities and by extension, supply chains face. They can be used to inform decision making for organisations of any size, such as large multinational corporations, small not-for-profits, and academic institutions. Although supply chains vary immensely across sectors, vulnerabilities, and the threats that exploit them, are relatively consistent. 

Who should attend the training?

The course should be attended by those who work in:  

- National Security 

- Military & Defence 

- Law Enforcement 

- Corporate Security, Procurement & Intelligence  

What are the training objectives?  

The four primary objectives of this course include:  

- Understanding company structures and networks 

  • Profiling technical artefacts (DNS, IPs, Technology Builds, Documents) 

  • Domain enumeration and visualisation to assess entity associations  

  • Trade Activity 

The COVID-19 pandemic has not been the only disruptor to global supply chains in 2020/21. The SolarWinds cyber-attack and the impact of escalating trade tensions have prompted many government agencies and organisations around the world to devote more attention and resources to supply chain risk and resilience. The Australian Government's focus on supply chains is being replicated by governments across the world.  

Businesses and government agencies manage risk through a process of local optimisation - meaning they do not integrate with their supply chain to manage risk. By using OSINT tools and techniques to analyse and assess risk within a supply chain becomes critical. This course teaches OSINT tools and techniques that reveal the threats and vulnerabilities corporate entities and by extension, supply chains face. They can be used to inform decision making for organisations of any size, such as large multinational corporations, small not-for-profits, and academic institutions. Although supply chains vary immensely across sectors, vulnerabilities, and the threats that exploit them, are relatively consistent.